Greer Farm at the Longview Farmer's Market

We will be at the Historic Longview Farmer's Market Saturday's starting August 3 with homemade jams, our farm honey and grass-fed beef, pasture raised, pork and chicken. Our pigs and chickens get a non-soy, non-gmo grain feed supplement. 8:00 am to noon at Cotton and High Streets, downtown Longview. Stop by and say hello! The market is also on Facebook.

Meat Prices & Availability 7-28-13

Prices and availability current as of July 28, 2013

Farm Products

$/pound
Availability

Farm Products
$/pound
Availability








Grass-Fed Beef




Pasture Raised Chicken



Bones for stock

$2.75

Now


Whole chickens 3-5 lbs.

$4.25

Now

Brisket(half)

$7.00

Now





Chuck roast

$6.50

Check Back


Pasture Raised Pork



Eye of Round

$7.50

Now


4 Inch breakfast links

$7.50

Now

Ground beef 

$6.50

Now


Baby back ribs

$6.50

Now

Heart

$4.50

Now


Bacon smoked

$8.00

Now

Heel of round Pikes Peak Roast

$7.00

Now


Boneless loin chop

$7.50

Now

Liver 

$4.50

Now


Bones for stock

$2.75

Now

Loin Top sirlion Steak

$11.00

Now


Bratwurst links

$7.50

Now

Loin Strip Steak

$11.00

Now


Breakfast sausage (natural seasoning)

$6.00

Now

Oxtail

$4.75

Now


Country style shoulder Boston butt

$7.00

Now

Rib Eye Steak*  

$16.50

Now


Fresh Italian sausage links

$7.50

Now

Round roast-bottom

$7.50

Check Back


Ground pork

$6.00

Now

Round roast-top

$7.50

Now


Pork fat

$3.00

Now

Round Steak 

$7.50

Check Back


Shoulder roast

$6.50

Now

Shank

$4.50

Now


Shoulder roast

$6.50

Now

Short Ribs 

$4.50

Now


Smoked Cajun sausage links

$8.25

Now

Shoulder Arm Roast

$7.00

Now


Smoked pork belly ends (bacon)

$5.00

Now

Sirloin Steak 

$10.50

Now


Spare ribs

$6.75

Now

Stew meat

$7.50

Now


Summer Sausage

$8.25

Now

T-bone Steak* 

$14.50

Now


Tenderloin

$15.00

Now

Tongue

$4.50

Now





Whole Tenderloin

$20.00

Now


Pasture Eggs



Beef Tenderloin steak

$15.00

Now


Dozen farm eggs

$5.00

Now








Fresh Homemade Bread




Homemade Jams & Sauces

$6.00

Now

Made to order or available

$5.00

Order





Pineywoods Post

A very interesting quaterly online publication from Texas Parks and Wildlife - East Texas:

Source:
Rusty Wood
Forest Stewardship Biologist
Texas Parks and Wildlife
324 CR 4191 Nacogdoches, TX. 75961
936-462-1111

Rusty.Wood@TPWD.Texas.Gov

Click link below

PPSummer2013

Last Week of Blueberries (Maybe)

Photo taken before dark Sunday July 21. Lots of wonderful blueberries still to be picked this week.

Blueberries

Meat Prices & Availability

Farm Product

$/pound
Availability




Grass-Fed Beef



Beef bones for stock

$2.75

Now

Beef shank

$4.50

Now

Brisket(half)

$7.00

Now

Ground beef 

$6.50

Now

Heart

$4.50

Now

Liver 

$4.50

Now

Oxtail

$4.75

Now

Rib Eye Steak*  

$16.50

Now

Roast 

$6.50

Check Back

Round Steak 

$7.50

Check Back

Short Ribs 

$4.50

Now

Sirloin Steak *

$10.50

Now

Stew meat

$7.50

Now

T-bone Steak* 

$14.50

Now

Tongue

$4.50

Now

Whole Tenderloin

$20.00

Now

*not big


Now





$/pound

Availability

Bulk Ground Beef



10-30 pounds

$6.25

Now

30 pounds or more

$6.00

Now




Pasture Raised Chicken



Whole chickens 3-5 lbs.

$4.25

Now




Pasture Raised Pork



4 Inch breakfast links

$7.50

Now

Babyback ribs

$6.50

Now

Bacon smoked

$8.00

Now

Boneless loin chop

$7.50

Now

Bones for stock

$2.75

Now

Bratwurst links

$7.50

Now

Breakfast sausage (natural seasoning)

$6.00

Now

Country style shoulder Boston butt

$7.00

Now

Fresh Italian sausage lnks

$7.50

Now

Ground pork

$6.00

Now

Pork fat

$3.00

Now

Shoulder roast

$6.50

Now

Shoulder roast

$6.50

Now

Smoked Cajun sausage links

$8.25

Now

Smoked pork belly ends (bacon)

$5.00

Now

Spare ribs

$6.75

Now

Summer Sausage

$8.25

Now

Tenderloin

$15.00

Now




Pasture Eggs



Dozen farm eggs

$5.00

Now




Fresh Homemade Bread



Made to order or available

$5.00

Order




Homemade Jams & Sauces

$6.00

Now

Frost Speak: Blueberries

by Robert Frost
Blueberries

"You ought to have seen what I saw on my way
To the village, through Mortenson's pasture to-day:
Blueberries as big as the end of your thumb,
Real sky-blue, and heavy, and ready to drum
In the cavernous pail of the first one to come!
And all ripe together, not some of them green
And some of them ripe! You ought to have seen!"
"I don't know what part of the pasture you mean."
"You know where they cut off the woods--let me see--
It was two years ago--or no!--can it be
No longer than that?--and the following fall
The fire ran and burned it all up but the wall."
"Why, there hasn't been time for the bushes to grow.
That's always the way with the blueberries, though:
There may not have been the ghost of a sign
Of them anywhere under the shade of the pine,
But get the pine out of the way, you may burn
The pasture all over until not a fern
Or grass-blade is left, not to mention a stick,
And presto, they're up all around you as thick
And hard to explain as a conjuror's trick."
"It must be on charcoal they fatten their fruit.
I taste in them sometimes the flavour of soot.
And after all really they're ebony skinned:
The blue's but a mist from the breath of the wind,
A tarnish that goes at a touch of the hand,
And less than the tan with which pickers are tanned."
"Does Mortenson know what he has, do you think?"
"He may and not care and so leave the chewink
To gather them for him--you know what he is.
He won't make the fact that they're rightfully his
An excuse for keeping us other folk out."
"I wonder you didn't see Loren about."
"The best of it was that I did. Do you know,
I was just getting through what the field had to show
And over the wall and into the road,
When who should come by, with a democrat-load
Of all the young chattering Lorens alive,
But Loren, the fatherly, out for a drive."
"He saw you, then? What did he do? Did he frown?"
"He just kept nodding his head up and down.
You know how politely he always goes by.
But he thought a big thought--I could tell by his eye--
Which being expressed, might be this in effect:
'I have left those there berries, I shrewdly suspect,
To ripen too long. I am greatly to blame.'"
"He's a thriftier person than some I could name."
"He seems to be thrifty; and hasn't he need,
With the mouths of all those young Lorens to feed?
He has brought them all up on wild berries, they say,
Like birds. They store a great many away.
They eat them the year round, and those they don't eat
They sell in the store and buy shoes for their feet."
"Who cares what they say? It's a nice way to live,
Just taking what Nature is willing to give,
Not forcing her hand with harrow and plow."
"I wish you had seen his perpetual bow--
And the air of the youngsters! Not one of them turned,
And they looked so solemn-absurdly concerned."
"I wish I knew half what the flock of them know
Of where all the berries and other things grow,
Cranberries in bogs and raspberries on top
Of the boulder-strewn mountain, and when they will crop.
I met them one day and each had a flower
Stuck into his berries as fresh as a shower;
Some strange kind--they told me it hadn't a name."
"I've told you how once not long after we came,
I almost provoked poor Loren to mirth
By going to him of all people on earth
To ask if he knew any fruit to be had
For the picking. The rascal, he said he'd be glad
To tell if he knew. But the year had been bad.
There had been some berries--but those were all gone.
He didn't say where they had been. He went on:
'I'm sure--I'm sure'--as polite as could be.
He spoke to his wife in the door, 'Let me see,
Mame, we don't know any good berrying place?'
It was all he could do to keep a straight face.
"If he thinks all the fruit that grows wild is for him,
He'll find he's mistaken. See here, for a whim,
We'll pick in the Mortensons' pasture this year.
We'll go in the morning, that is, if it's clear,
And the sun shines out warm: the vines must be wet.
It's so long since I picked I almost forget
How we used to pick berries: we took one look round,
Then sank out of sight like trolls underground,
And saw nothing more of each other, or heard,
Unless when you said I was keeping a bird
Away from its nest, and I said it was you.
'Well, one of us is.' For complaining it flew
Around and around us. And then for a while
We picked, till I feared you had wandered a mile,
And I thought I had lost you. I lifted a shout
Too loud for the distance you were, it turned out,
For when you made answer, your voice was as low
As talking--you stood up beside me, you know."
"We sha'n't have the place to ourselves to enjoy--
Not likely, when all the young Lorens deploy.
They'll be there to-morrow, or even to-night.
They won't be too friendly--they may be polite--
To people they look on as having no right
To pick where they're picking. But we won't complain.
You ought to have seen how it looked in the rain,
The fruit mixed with water in layers of leaves,
Like two kinds of jewels, a vision for thieves."
These blueberries must have come from Greer Farm

Abandoned City: Detroit in Ruins

Photos are chilling to say the least.
These photographers have captured a scary scene of the past, present and perhaps the future of cities that do not keep their economy growing. The Ruins of Detroit.

What's In Your Chicken & More


The food we eat in America. Excellent, thought provoking article.

Article

Newsletter July 2013

This is our July Newsletter

Berry Patch Picking Nearing the End
We had a late freeze that diminished the number of blueberries and a late start due to cool weather, but the berry season has been a great success. 
For the first time in several years, we had lots of blackberries.  There are a few gallons still picked every day, but they are about finished for this year.  The older vines produced well and the ones planted two years ago are quickly coming into full production.  We will plant all the open areas in the berry patch this fall with additional blackberries.
The blueberries have been wonderful this year; large and sweet.  There are still lots of blueberries to pick and we anticipate they will last through the weekend of July 20 or later.  We will post online and on Facebook (Greer Farm) the status of picking.  Starting July 12, we will open at 6:45 AM to allow picking in the cooler part of the day.  We can stay open late if you desire and you pick in the shade after 4:30 PM. 
Post season work in the berry patch will include pruning out every blackberry branch that has a berry this year. and a major pruning of all of the blueberry plants.  If you like this sort of work, we invite volunteers to come and help a lot or a little.  For us it's a labor of love as it lays the ground for next year's harvest. 
Kick back on the Lake: Log Cabin Rentals
We will soon enter the slower time of the summer and have a lot more availability in our cabins and the barn loft.  Our price reduction special to 2012 prices continues until the end of July for a three night rental.  Regular rentals can be single nights during the week and two nights on weekends.  Many are lining up dates for the rest of the year, especially in the fall when it is cool and the forest changes into fall color.
Local Festival
The annual Naples Watermelon Festival and Rodeo is the weekend of July 26th.  It is a great family event to experience.  We have cabins and the loft available.  This is a once in a lifetime event for city folks.  Enjoy a small town parade, festive activities all day, free water melon in the afternoon and in the evening a rodeo that is as good as they get.  Check it out here.
Plan a Special Event
Special events appear to be very popular this year.  Think about creating your own event as a get-a-way with friends, family or a work retreat. There are many possibilities including renting the four cabins and the barn loft, having a private farm to fork cooking class, either a lunch or elegant dinner in the evening in the farm house, a cowboy breakfast, evening cookout around a camp fire or whatever you can imagine. The farm is an excellent place for a book club or other group to get away as a retreat site.  We can accommodate groups for events in the farm house.
Weddings on the Farm
Sometimes a photo is an easier way to illustrate an idea.  Both of our daughters were married here.  Each in a unique setting.  These photos are from our youngest daughter's wedding at the farm.  Our farm has every possible wedding venue you can imagine in a rural setting.  It's a natural place that allows you to plan your wedding around the environment we offer.  Give us a chance to discuss your ideas about a country farm wedding and see what is possible. 
Farm to Fork Cooking Classes
This month we have two farm to fork cooking classes.  Tomorrow, July 13, is focused on Salads and uses many products raised on the farm.  There is limited availability, so call now to reserve a spot.  July 20 is Cooking with Spirits.  Not the kind that go bump in the night, but the ones that come in a bottle full of different flavors when used in cooking.  Both of these classes are hands on by the participants. 
In August, Chef Eva's Farm to Fork Cooking Classes head south of the border.   Enchiladas, Moles and Tamales is August 3rd and Belizean Cooking August 24th.  Go to our website for more details on these and classes later in the year.
Now is a good time to plan a private cooking class for family or friends later in the year and make it a weekend booking the cabins and barn loft.  Contact us for the many different class menu options available. 
Greer Farm Jams and Sauces
Chef Eva is back on the farm after traveling to Colorado and Nicaragua. She has so many different kinds of fruit jams that she makes from our farm or local farmers.  Her popular fig and peach based jams and sauces will be available soon as the new crop ripens.  We have a variety of jams made with strawberries and blueberries.  Check our website occasionally for updates on what is available. 
All Natural Eggs, Pork, Beef and Chicken
A farm would not be a farm if it did not have chickens, pigs and cattle.  Ours is not any different.  All our animals are raised in as natural an environment as possible and we do not stimulate their growth with artificial substances. The cattle are 100% grass fed.  They never receive grain.  Our poultry and pigs are pasture raised free range and are supplemented with feed that is NON-SOY and NON-GMO (genetically modified). No Round-Up ready grain is fed to our animals.  We get our feed from a small mill near Waco and bring it here to the farm every few months; expensive, but we feel it is a necessity.  Our price list is dated.  We will be updating it late next week on our website when we get in a new supply of beef and pork.  This will include pork Cajun sausage, link breakfast sausage, sweet Italian sausage, summer sausage, and bratwurst.  These are all natural. We will have all cuts of beef and continue to have whole French Red Ranger chickens. 
This and That
We farm a piece of land that was first cleared in the 1840's and the farm house was built shortly thereafter.  Time moves slow here, we try to keep up with the things that matter.  This includes how we communicate with you.  At this time, our website is going through a complete revision to make it easier for you to find out what you want to know about our farm. More important, our blog will be easier to use and for once the photos will be right for each blog.  The cabin DIRECTV system was upgraded this week with a new satellite dish and system. Wi-Fi is always a challenge, but we think the system we have or wide area networking is as good as you can get out in the country. All of the cabins, barn loft, bunkhouse, shop, farmhouse and areas adjcent to them are now live.  In setting-up three DSL lines, we even were able to offer free long distance (for those with ATT, sprint or T-Mobile wireless phones - Verizon still is best, for the most part, in rural America) in the cabins.
 From Our Farm to Your Home
We want you to feel our farm is your farm.  Share our newsletter with your friends and family.  Continue to call or email us if you have any questions or need more information. Better yet, stop by and visit (call in advance if you can) and see what is happening at The Greer Farm.
Best wishes for a wonderful July,
Sid, Eva and all of us on the farm
We are approaching mid-summer quickly.  Memorial Day weekend and the 4th of July are now memories.  After a very cool week the end of June, we suddenly had more traditional summer hot days with mild evenings.   Things were starting to dry out and our pastures needed rain.  Yesterday evening we received about 3 inches from a passing heat storm so the lake is again fresh and things will turn green again. On the farm, hay has been baled, vegetable garden rows turned ready for fall planting, the berry season is in the last weeks, and cabin rentals are brisk.  It was amazing to see the lake covered with all of our paddle boats, kayaks, canoes and jon boats along with personal floats last weekend.  What a great place to gather and relax in almost total privacy.  Picking berries in the early morning and spending the rest of the day on the lake fishing and swimming.  We hear so often that Greer Farm is an "oasis of splendor", "a special place", or "this is my dream and you are living it". 

Plan a Farm Wedding

Only recently did we consider the farm a venue for weddings. Our daughters were married here and these photos give some idea of a more formal affair. Being out in the country and on a farm, there are so many interesting possibilities. The large area between the cabins on the lake is very nice. We are open to the hosting and catering weddings.

Wedding at Greer Farm

Greer Farm Wedding

Greer Farm Wedding

Greer Farm Wedding

Cooking with Spirits

Cooking With Spirits
Farm to Fork Cooking Class
Saturday, July 20, 2013 at the Farm
11:00 AM $85


Farm to Fork Cooking Class

Much has been said and written about the evils of rum, but when it comes to using sprits in cooking it’s another matter.  Can you  imagine how American cuisine suffered when we were forced to use bootleg Canadian whiskey or Arkansas moonshine in our kitchen.  The spirits we will use in this class bring out flavors you will be amazed by.  Don’t worry if you have qualms about consuming spirits.  These spirits will be cooked out and only their savory flavor will remain. 

Grilled goat cheese and gin crostini with orange salsa
Ice tomato and vodka soup
Portabella crabs Rockefeller with Pernod
Drunken mushrooms with brandy
Pepper steak with chive butter and cognac
Peach cassis parfait with champagne

Naples Watermelon Festival & Rodeo July 25-26-27

If you want some real local excitment and fun, rent a cabin at Greer Farm and attend the Naples Watermelon Festival & Rodeo the weekend of July 26. Guaranteed good time for all, but expecially the kids. Free watermelon and a great family rodeo. Check this link for details.

Cabins and loft available. Call 903-645-3232 to make a reservation.


Farm Office Window

The distinct advantage of living in rural America is lifestyle. If you live on a farm, it is even better since you have no close neighbors. This photo is taken from the farm office window, over the desk, looking out to a vegetable garden and two paddocks; one with a few heifers and cows and the other quarter horses and Pepper our Zebra. It is over 90 degrees now, but was mid 60's at sun up. I open the window for a long as I can before it gets real hot. I feel a slight summer breeze and hear so many bird sounds. Butterflies are ever present just at the windows edge. Purple Martins have a house I can see and they fly back and forth to feed the baby birds and to catch bugs. They make a pleasant sound. It is a relaxed place to work when you have to be inside.

Life is what you make it where ever you are planted.


Farm Life

Blueberries on July 4th 2013

This photo was taken this afternoon after many pickers during the July 4th holiday. While the blackberries are fading, this is the prime time to pick blueberries. There are abundant, large and sweet just waiting to be picked. We have an unlimited supply at this point making picking easy. Don't delay. We are open every day 7:30 am until 5:30 pm or earlier or later if you call. 903-645-3232

Pasted Graphic 1

Wildflowers on the Farm

Last fall I found a handful of old wildflower seeds from 2010 in a sack. These were tossed at random near the cabins by a tree that had blown down. It was amazing how natural the flowers seemed this summer.

Greer Farm Texas Wildflowers